Sara Kingsley

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Bio

I am currently a PhD Scholar in Computer Science (HCI/AI/NLP) at the Human-Computer Interaction Institute at Carnegie Mellon University. 

I study the design of digital economies and online markets for work, health, financial credit and government services. I do this by applying the tools of applied microeconomics (in particular, labor economics), machine learning, NLP, and computational social sciences to study market factors that impact the economic opportunities people have.

I have graduate-level training in economics & econometrics, and a B.A. in Social Thought & Political Economy from the University of Massachusetts Amherst. 


I am a member of the working group on Data Economies & Governance for Mechanism Design for Social Good. I previously co-organized the group with Swathi Sadagopan and George Obaido (2019-2020). Before, I co-organized the Online Labor Markets (OLM) group with Manish Ragahavan (2018-2019).

My co-conspirators in research include: Sarah Fox (CMU), Motahhare Eslami (CMU), Carolyn Rose (CMU), Six Silberman, Araba Sey (RIA Africa), Shamika Goddard (Colorado), Casey Fiesler (Colorado), Rediet Abebe (Berkeley), George Obaido (Witwatersrand), Elena Glassman (Harvard), Kehinde Aruleba (Witwatersrand), Abeba Birhane (UCD), Samantha Shorey (Texas), and many stellar undergraduate students who I learn from and who inspire my reasons for doing a PhD.

My research is currently funded by the NSF (grant award #2037348). 

Research Interests

I examine how digital platforms, algorithms, and mechanisms ("incentives") allocate resources and economic opportunities among people. My interest is to understand if outcomes are equitable at the systems or societal level.

In cases where technology causes harm, e.g., a demographic group is disadvantaged by decisions and how resources are distributed, I study what tools might help address this. Tools may include policy reform, changes to computer and interface design, and reforming algorithms (or getting rid of them in the decision-making process). Where possible, I design software to intervene at different stages of machine processes that lead to harmful outcomes.

The hope of my work is to imagine resolutions or commitments that address social problems in computing. The resolutions that my work explores include those that are diagnostic in nature (cf. Abebe et. al. 2020, "Roles for Computing"). An example of diagnostic work in computing could include auditing social media platforms for digital discrimination in advertising. 

Ultimately, computation is just one tool in a wide menu of options that allow us to learn about opportunity and justice and distribution in a society. Computer scientists have a responsibility to understand how the tools they build amplify (and cause) harm, and this is the focus of my work.

 
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Career

I have worked for the Chief Economist of Microsoft Corporation and for the technology policy team of Microsoft's Chief Legal Officer. I also have completed a number of PhD internships with Microsoft Research.

I started my career in public service. I worked for President Barack Obama at the U.S. Department of Labor as a Legislative Officer to Congress. Before joining the Obama Administration, I worked as a Staff Assistant for the U.S. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP). During my time in the Senate, I helped senior counsel of the late U.S Senator Edward M. Kennedy of Massachusetts work on the Affordable Care Act (through committee) and the Matthew Shepard and James Byrd Hate Crimes Prevention Act (through senate passage [congressional record]), both formative experiences that have continued to shape my career to date.

Other formative experiences include working with a team of network engineers, another economist, and lawyers to deploy and study Wi-Fi networks in Botswana, Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, Morocco, Namibia, South Africa, and Tanzania; as well as in the Philippines, and in Virginia, United States. I played a very small part in helping another team of network engineers launch a submarine fiberoptic cable that now crosses the Atlantic ocean, from Virginia beach to Bilboa, Spain. The cable is named Marea.

 

“The things you do for others remain”

Kalu Ndukwe Kalu

 
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©2020 by Sara Kingsley